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The Places We Love

Sometimes whenever I am meeting someone new, or making conversation with a friend, I ask the question: “If you could have a superpower, what would it be?”

I feel I can get a sense of who their person is and what their desires in life are by the way they answer the question.

I always say that I would want to teleport myself. My answer has never changed.

I am very much aware that I love traveling, but I always picture myself teleporting myself to the same places.

The same place I would just love to transport myself at the blink of an eye (in this case quite

Photo by Melissa Thomas

literally).

Maybe some places – just like some people – have a magnetic effect on us. We can’t seem to stop thinking about going back to these places, being there even if it’s just for an afternoon coffee. They feel like our place to be, They could feel like home.

Yet, something is stopping us from fully moving to these places.  Something is holding us back – or we truly believe that.

We want to appear there. Experience the place in short spouts, long spouts. Sometimes just yearn for them; yet not fully engage.

We say to ourselves, one day, one day I will go back and I will stay. I will make that place my home. For now, I will just dream about teleporting myself there from time to time.

 

Emanuela’s Napoli: Full Naples Interview Transcript

Last week, I wrote a post titled “Local Perspective: Emanuela and the Fascinating Woman that is Naples,” in which I collaborated with a Neapolitan friend of mine. I asked my friend Emanuela about the city where she was born and raised to write a local profile. Through her answers I quickly noticed her passion for her city. If you haven’t read that post, you can do so here! I would love to hear your thoughts. For those of you who have and are curious for more, here is Emanuela’s full transcript to all of my questions for her:

– What is your favorite thing about your city?

The most peculiar trait of Naples is its intensity.

It is, par excellence, the city of contrasts where many different factors live together in an incredibly harmonious way. I always say that it is some kind of a blessing to be a Neapolitan. The city flows in your blood; and it is a bittersweet curse you bring in your heart wherever you are. Just like an incredibly fascinating woman, there is no way the city won’t shock you. You will either deeply love her or hate her, but one thing is sure: you will never forget her. You can start observing these contrasts from the urban planning of the city itself. Bourgeois and less rich quartiers were (and are) literally intertwined. Creating an incredibly rich melting pot of culture and social characteristics. This peculiarity puts its roots back in the history of the city. Naples is a gorgeous microcosm that witnesses the course of European history, as a result of numerous civilizations that have dominated it. Its origins start on the neolithic era, on the “Pizzofalcone” hill and, since then, it has never stopped to be among the most attractive areas of the Mediterranean. Its strategic position in the Mediterranean basin, its natural beauties and resources, the prosperity of the highly-mineral soil, have been the main attractive factors for the Greek and Roman colonizations of the region; nowadays still witnessed by the amazing “Pompei” and “Ercolano.” Since then, the city’s cultural, monumental, and architectural heritage still shows the long excursus of dominations that brought Naples to be the third most important European city in the 18th Century, together with PAris and London in terms of population, scientific, and artistic progress. Fun fact? The most ancient railway, water system, and among the most ancient opera theaters (San Carlo Theater), and universities (Federico II), were born here! All those influences are still in the veins of the city and its citizens, and you will notice it through the mixed architectures, the extreme noise, the rooted traditions, the intense smells, flavors and colors. You’ll find yourself in a city with an ancient soul, where the openness to diversity will accompany your discovery through its splendid “Vicoli.”

 

Photo by Emanuela Cervo

 

– What is a staple of a true Neapolitan?

Definitely humor and intensity. Neapolitans are known for their extreme ways of being, their hilarious jokes, and their lightness mixed up with deep wisdom. Getting to know Neapolitans is a way to complete the journey through the city and profoundly understand it. If you have any italian friend from another region, you will certainly get the difference!

 

– What is a tradition that you only find in Naples?

In Naples traditions are an integral part of the social structure. They are still alive, and not only in the elders’ memory. They are enthusiastically handed down to new generations and they live in the contemporary life. The most famous one is definitely the “Miracle of Saint Gennaro;” Patron protector of the city. According to the tradition, the relic of the Saint (his blood contained in an ampoule), must get liquefied each year on December 16th, May, and September 19th. It is viewed as an auspicious sign, which is believed confirms that the Saint protects the city. According to the tradition, on December 1631, the Saint has been able to stop the lava of the Vesuvius eruption at the foot of Naples. Contrarily, it is believed that when the blood didn’t liquefy (various time during the 20th Century) those years were signed by miseries, such as in 1939 with the beginning of the 1st World War, in 1973 with an epidemic cholera, and a powerful earthquake in 1980. For this reason, on those dates hundreds of faithful, various religious and city authorities get reunited at the Duomo Church to devotedly pray and observe together this phenomenon. No matter if you believe in the miracle or not, the experience is extreme! Another fun fact: the “Treasure of Saint Gennaro” (located just few steps away the Duomo Church) is the most precious collection of the World, followed by the (English) Crown Jewels. Curious to know who’s the owner? The city of Naples and its citizens! An amazing treasure enriched thanks to the devotion of Royal families and the faithful. An often forgotten must see, I highly recommend!

 

– Is there something Neapolitans say that is specific to the city? What about 20 something Neapolitans?

You will find that almost everyone has a positive obsession about the city. We love it, we protect it from negative messages, we belong to it. If you have time, it would be a great to visibly experience this obsession at the Stadium, when the Napoli team plays. I don’t appreciate football at all, but I must say that the emotion I felt there is astonishing, and reflects many peculiarities of the city. People come together in that place; incredibly different people from diverse backgrounds, but they find themselves united by one singular faith. The intensity of the chorus, the energy spread by all the Napoli supporters, the cohesion created among people is an overwhelming and breathtaking feeling. To be noted: Naples is a very Catholic city (with almost 500 churches) and you will often find “Edicole Votive” and religious signs all over the city, but pay attention: the second religion here is definitely the “calcio” game and the Napoli football team!

 

– What is something people in their 20s do typically in their free time in Naples?

Generally speaking, I would definitely say hanging out with friends, eat and drink together. And I mean in a very excessive way! We love to party and we always search for good excuses to enjoy life. Friendship is a fundamental factor here; but every stranger will always find very welcoming and extroverted people around. Thanks to our good weather we spend a lot of time in open air, walking through the streets and chilling in main squares for entire nights, chatting and laughing. Young Neapolitans are often fun, very talkative and they love to speak a lot and laugh loudly.

 

– Where is your favorite place to hangout? Why?

It really depends; but the great thing is that, based on your mood, you have plenty of choice. In the mood to be in the crowd in a genuine way? If so, a great choice would be the historical center. Few places make you feel so alive in the world! There are plenty of delicious restaurants; and after dinner there are many beautiful squares (Piazza Bellini, Piazza San Domenico Maggiore, Piazzetta Nilo) where you can cherish a great regional wine (Falanghina, Coda di Volpe, Biancolella, Aglianico, and Moio highly recommended); and get to know some locals. The language barrier could still be a problem, but you’ll see how the Italian gestural language will help you through this journey. Oh, and try to learn some Neapolitan words. There are so many nouns with particular nuances that can’t be really translated in other languages!

 

– What is your favorite restaurant? Bar? Why?

That’s what I call a hard question! Here it is almost impossible not to have an incredible food experience. Thanks to a vast variety of traditional recipes and great local ingredients, we are lucky enough to have among the most delicious cuisines in the world. Very heavy though, get prepared! I also appreciate the “democracy” when it comes to food here: you can even have a great street food meal starting from 2 euros (for example for a “pizza a portafoglio”).

As for the pizza I really love “Concettina ai Tre Santi”, an old family-run business in one of the most difficult (but also beautiful) neighborhoods called “La Sanità”. I would suggest to go there very early not to wait hours to get a table. All the pizzas are amazing, just remember to start trying the “frittatina di pasta” as appetizer. I would suggest to go first to the amazing “Cimitero delle Fontanelle” and then, after the pizza, to take a nice walk to “Palazzo dello Spagnuolo” and “Palazzo San Felice.”

If you feel like having a romantic dinner, I would definitely suggest to go to “Marechiaro” zone (on Posillipo Hill) at “Cicciotto a Marechiaro”. You’ll find a wonderful panorama right on the sea, a relaxing environment and you’ll not feel like being in the city anymore! A little secret for the adventurous ones: there is a wonderful place where you can have a splendid night swim just 10 minutes by walking from there. The place is informally called “Scoglione”, and you will have to reach it passing through the sea and climbing just a bit. I can assure you that having a swim there, with the Vesuvius right in front of you and no one around, is going to be an incredible experience.

There is also a newly opened restaurant, “Classico Ristorante Italiano,” which I like a lot. Right in the heart of the Chiaia quartier, the restaurant offers a quiet and elegant place where to experience a great traditional cuisine lead by an innovation kick, a great choice of wines and a pleasant outdoor space.

As per the bars, I would suggest “Spazio Nea” in the historical center. It is located in the crowded and lively Piazza Bellini, but it has a splendid outdoor where to sip drinks with friends just a step out of the chaos. Another bar I suggest is certainly the “Happening”, at the center of the Movida area of “Baretti” in Chiaia, where you can find a nice crowd of clients and super great cocktails.

 

– What kind of music does the young Neapolitan generation listen to?

Lately, there’s been a big spread of Latin-American music. After all, we have Hispanic blood and its musicality perfectly fits the lively and dynamic rhythm of the streets.

 

– What is a typical thing to do on weekends?

It all depends on the season. During Spring and Summer, if possible, we definitely prefer to get away to one of the enchanting beauties close to the city. An example? By ferry or private boat (also possible to rent), you can reach in about 30 minutes our islands: Capri, Ischia, and Procida. Another option could be the Costiera Sorrentina and Amalfitana. We would need an entire chapter just for these beauties, so just choose one of them by heart and based on your character! My favorites are definitely Capri for its magic and its blue sea that I love to sail on the typical “gozzo” boat, Ischia for its diversity and its thermal baths (“Miramare Sea Resort and Spa” is my favorite) and Positano, which is just a real dream.

If you wanna stay in the city, I adore to getaway by Kayak around the Gulf. Enjoy the silence and the nature, surrounded by the wonderful architecture of Posillipo and with the picturesque Naples panorama as a background. For this, I really recommend the “Kayak Napoli” crew: professional, super fun, and kind guys (they have two locations in Posillipo, easy to reach).

During Autumn and Winter, luckily, Napoli is a big city with a wide offer of alternatives. Restaurants, bars, night clubs are always incredibly crowded and lively, and the weather is generally good. For these reasons, especially during Christmas, the city remains a popular destination also for Italians from other Regions.

 

– What is something weird about the city? Something unexpected

Napoli has also suffered of numerous catastrophes: destructions, eruptions, earthquakes, bombings, tidal waves, plagues and fires. For this reason, the city has developed a particular cohabitation with death; which is nowadays still translated in a fascinating esoteric approach to life that is still alive in traditions, legends, and monuments. Even in despair, the city learnt to face difficulties with a bitter sweet smile and a profound positivity you can still feel everywhere.

Photo by Emanuela Cervo

 

– If I was there for only 24 hours, what should I do?

Stay longer is an option? Jokes apart, even for a local a lifetime won’t be enough to discover Naples!

I would definitely suggest to get yourself lost in the historical center, going with the flow and experiencing the place with eyes and heart wide open. Let’s try to find a one-day path to see as much as possible. You can start your tour from the Duomo Church, visit it and the Treasure of Saint Gennaro. Keep on going towards “Via dei Tribunali” and take a stop at “Napoli Sotterranea” to visit the underground beauties of Naples. Have a great pizza at “Di Matteo” or “Sorbillo” and start again wandering toward the beauties of “Piazza San Domenico Maggiore” (near there, a must see is the “Cappella San Severo” with the “Veiled Christ” sculpture). Take a coffee and a sfogliatella at “Scaturchio” and head to “Basilica di Santa Chiara”, then to “Piazza del Gesù” and the baroque pearl “Gesù Nuovo Church”. Go to “Via Roma” and be sure to take a fantastic ice cream at “Mennella” (I swear, among the best of my life). Fill your eyes with beauty in “Piazza del Plebiscito”, visit the “Royal Palace” and, if on time, also the “San Carlo Theater” known as the most beautiful theater in the world. Time for another coffee? Go to the “Gambrinus”, and find yourself teleported in an historical bar of the 20 th century. Then, continue on “Via Chiaia” and go to the classy Chiaia neighborhood. After a rapid look at the amazing stairs of “Palazzo Mannajuolo” then rapidly go to “Borgo Marinari”, located on the Lungomare. It would be amazing to take a visit at the “Castel dell’Ovo” Castle and to have a nice aperitivo in front of the sea to enjoy a spectacular sunset. Walk all the way long to “Mergellina”, take a cab and have dinner in “Marechiaro”.

Napoli is a true and genuine city, which can seem to be untouched by globalization from certain point of views. Getting lost in its chaos and craziness will definitely make you feel extremely alive and its contrasts will shake you from within. Experience. Enjoy people’s kindness, invasiveness, joy and let your soul be filled by all of that. And, of course, don’t forget to put as many food-stops as you could along the way!

 

GLOBALIZATION AND CHANGE, NOTHING NEW

“This is what globalization is all about”

I said as I took a bite of my arepa (aka. the Venezuelan daily bread) filled with mozzarella cheese. In the background, the beat of the Norwegian DJ Kygo filled the room. I made the observation with bemusement, and my friend who had spent the last week exploring Los Angeles and some of San Jose shared the feeling; after all, my friend Gesi was from Germany, and we had known each other for two years after meeting in New York City. While taking another bite, Gesi tapped the table, which only drove the point home for me. Swedish furniture. Sweden was also present in our dining experience.

Perhaps there are still corners of the world where this kind of diversity is kept to a minimum. Perhaps it goes by unnoticed. Certainly in the metropolitan cities of the world this is no longer the case, no matter how much people fight it. The exchange of cultures is not a new tendency, it has just become quicker and more widespread in our modern age.

This past week in my current SoCal city, I had dinner with a Roman in a Neapolitan pizzeria (MiDiCi, and I recommend), had breakfast in a Cuban bakery (Porto’s) with my German friend and an Italian from Naples, had dinner with a Puerto Rican and a girl who is from Miami, but is also from Peru and Argentina, sang to the beat of Hotel California with a friend from Russia, and had quesadilla with a friend from Mexico.

I no longer look at these moments with awe, or with any sort of surprise. Maybe I should. They are wonderful moments, and I have created a life for myself where there is a constant flow and exchange of cultural ideas. Listening to a different language being spoken can be music to my ears, and often it activates my hunger for learning. For language is the gateway for culture, and a different language can even represent a slight change in personality. Often I wish my friends who know me in spoken English, knew me in spoken Spanish. It is a different experience. It is like jumping into a parallel universe and into someone else’s world.

People who are multilingual are constantly jumping between worlds with ease, and with little thought.

There is still a fight by those holding on to an idea of Patriotism. Makes sense, we are tribal beings, but tribes are not always defined by where we are born. We have the power to choose them. But with a mix of nostalgia and hope, I look at the future and I know everything I know will be different. Languages that I cherish, will most likely perish or transform with time. Most likely not in my lifetime, but it will happen. I already feel the loss, regardless of the fact that I will not see that happen. We have to learn to embrace the change; for it is nothing new, it is just becoming more and more apparent with the rapid pace of our times.

WHY WE LOVE BIG CITIES – I DREAM OF NY, I DREAM OF EUROPE

For a little over a year, I have been living in Los Angeles. I haven’t yet warmed up to the city to the extent that I feel comfortable to call it my home; yet, when I first arrived to Los Angeles I absolutely loved it. Why? The beaches, the weather, the mountains, the proximity to both ocean and snow, the diversity, the food, you name it! The creativity! There are so many people that come to this city with a vision of making their dreams a reality. So many artists, writers, musicians, filmmakers. I felt surrounded by people that understood my desire for a creative life. Yet, I haven’t been able to call it home.

After a long inner search, it finally dawned on me. I miss that constant novelty I got in New York City. Where all I had to do was step outside my door without worrying about a car or parking and I knew I could find a world of possibilities. An adventure awaited. LA is a big city, and unfortunately, not the best example for public transportation. There are great pockets to the city. But having to drive to them takes away from the spontaneity that I personally crave.

I am drawn to travel. I dream of a European home. Weekend trips to different cultures by simply jumping on a train; different architecture, different languages spoken. European cities are built for the human scale, for walking; for experiencing architectural beauty every few steps. I see that in my future, but for now, my craving goes to the concrete jungle in the East Coast. New York still holds my heart, even with all of its imperfections (aka. the subway at rush hour).

Turns out, my craving of novelty is a very basic human need. We are biologically disposed to want to be in locations with variety, with differences, with complexity. We all have different ways of fulfilling this need. Perhaps many don’t even realize why, or how to fill it. There is even research that suggests humans are healthier when we live among variety. That the cities of the future, especially here in the US, that are built for the bottom line, could cause even more depression – among other health issues. Boredom increases cortisol levels more than sadness.

Imagine the cumulative effects of working and living in the same dull environment. Day after day.  Ughh.

Yes, I realize this took a dark turn. It all started with a sunny happy description of Los Angeles. The wonderful city of Los Angeles. I truly do think it’s beautiful. It does need to work on it’s infrastructure for better public transportation. With so many artists in the city, I don’t think it is living up to it’s best potential just yet. For now, I am here to point this out, but I see myself moving back to New York City. After all, I know I have unfinished business with that town, and with that, be closer to my beloved Europe.

Cheers!

What do you think? How do you look for novelty in your life?

Documentary Review: “A World Not Ours”

“The old will die and the young will forget”

These are the words attributed to Israeli Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion. He was referring to Palestinian refugees and assuring his fellow Zionists that Palestinians would never try to return to their homes.

In the documentary film “A World Not Ours,” filmmaker Mahdi Fleifel shows us that this statement is certainly untrue. The young Palestinians are now old refugees and they still hold on to the idea that Palestine will once again be their home. The young Palestinians however, are trapped in a sort of limbo. Being stateless is their lifestyle, and they only become nationals of a country when the FIFA World cup comes around every four years.

Fleifel’s film is sentimental and takes a very different approach to documenting the refugee crisis. A very personal approach given that some of his own family is still trapped within one kilometer of Ain el-Hilweh; the refugee camp home to over 70 thousand people in the south of Lebanon.

Ain el-Hilweh, Palestinian refugee camp housing over 70 thousand refugees

“To me, going to Ain el-Hilweh was better than going to Disneyland” remarks Fleifel in a voice-over. He says that it took him years to realize that the people in the camp were not there by choice. Through old home footage of children playing football in the streets, and celebrating the FIFA World Cup, he outlines his skewed childhood views and contrasts them with footage of the Palestine-Israeli conflict and the disillusionment of those who are trapped at the camp.

He interviews his friends, uncle, and grandfather, which in turn humanizes the faceless statistics about the plight of the refugees. His friend Abu-Eyad puts our everyday conflict into perspective, when he remarks that he would like to “go on a mission’ and blow himself up, because he sees no future for himself – trapped in a place where his everyday life has absolutely no meaning.

Abu-Eyad in his home, in Ain el-Hilweh

“Palestinians really fucked us over, I wish Israel would just massacre us all…” says Abu-Eyad while contemplating his future.

This film was filled with contrasts. The music was upbeat, yet the feeling inside the camp was one of helplessness. Is this how human life should work? They belong to no state so they are not allowed to live a fruitful life? The immediate answer should be no. That is not however, how thousands upon thousands of refugees view their life. Just like Abu-Eyad, they see no future, and they see no meaning.

You can watch the trailer here. Also, don’t hesitate to comment, or contact me to let me know what you think!

Documentary Review: “Thank You For The Rain”

Good documentaries connect you with the world; they bring you another perspective, or perhaps transport you into the past.

Thank You For The Rain” takes us to a small village in Kenya, where Kisilu Musya is attempting to organize his community to become more empowered in the drought that faces them, by planting trees to bring in the rain.

Musya’s wife in Kenya. Photo taken from “Thank You For The Rain.”

The documentary was directed by Julia Dahr, a Norwegian filmmaker who after meeting Kisilu, is drawn by his enthusiasm and drive to make a change. After asking Musya if she document him and his family for a month, she accepts an unconventional request: to share the camera with him. Kisilu is not exactly an experienced cinematographer, but through his lens, the message of the documentary is even clearer: the problem of climate change is not a theoretical one, it is an everyday man problem.

We begin by seeing Kisilu’s village facing a drought that is severely affecting farming; forcing other farmers in the community to seek other work. Kisilu’s family struggles with making ends meet, and his son is sent back from school because the tuition had not been paid. Despite the trouble, the farmer remains optimistic that the rain will come.

“Everything is being contradicted”

The village starts seeing signs of rain and are happily expecting the first teardrop. Soon the rain comes, and flood comes with it. Kisilu’s home loses its roof and trees fall due to the storm of rain. Yet, the farmer uses this obstacle to remove the apathy of his village towards climate change, and drive them to action by spearheading a tree planting campaign.

Kisilu Musya in kenya organizing his community. Photo taken from “Thank You For The Rain.”

Through his activism, Kisilu gets invited to Norway, to speak among climate activists. Where he learns about the European lifestyle, sees snow for the first time, and is amazed at the living conditions Norwegians manage through such difficult weather. He goes back to Kenya with a new sort of enlightenment, with the idea of bringing European effectiveness and organization to his hometown. There, his activism becomes his sole purpose.

Shortly thereafter, the Climate Change Summit takes place in Paris, and Musya is thrilled to receive an invitation to speak at the United Nations where world leaders are making decisions. His initial excitement quickly turns to frustration when he realizes most leaders who are there to “fight climate change,” will only do something to fight the problem just as long as it does not interfere with their economic endeavors. Tensions are high in the climate summit, and disagreements between leaders result in a climate agreement that is disappointing to most climate activists. Especially Kisilu, who goes back to Kenya still determined to put in efforts every single day to improve his community.

Dahr perfectly captures the farmer’s strength and resilience of spirit; and the message is clear to anyone who loves this planet. Even if you go at it alone, you must put in effort every day to save it.

You can watch the trailer here!

Kisilu Musya at COP21 Summit about to speak in front of policymakers. Photo taken from “Thank You For The Rain.”

Why Eating Pizza in Napoli Changed My Perspective on Food

After an hour on the “Frecciarossa” (Italy’s express train), I was already savoring what would come next. The world famous Neapolitan pizza. I stepped out of the train on a Saturday morning in the middle of October to find a sort of beautiful chaos ruling the southern city of Naples. There were pedestrians challenging the cars and walking among them. Vehicles taking the traffic signals (if there were any) for granted; resulting in a disarray of cars, vespas, and taxis going in all (and unclear) directions. This was a day trip. a discovery trip; I wanted to rediscover pizza.

A few days earlier I was in Rome and I had called my friend Tiziana to ask her if she would meet me in Naples for some pizza. Tiziana lives in Salerno (to the south of Naples), and there was no better friend to guide me through the not-so-orderly south of Italy. She very clearly told me to stay in “Napoli Centrale” (Napoli’s train station) and wait for her before exploring on my own. Titi (as I call her), was among the many voices to tell me that Naples would be too chaotic for me to venture out on my own. Don’t get me wrong, I loved the chaos, the anarchy. It was exhilarating and full of life. Who wants calm and order all the time? I mean, after all, this was an investigation in the name of pizza; which is basically the meaning of life. What better sort of food is worth getting lost over?

We zigzag the neapolitan streets, passing what seemed like an endless amount of leather shoe stores. We walk through small cobblestone alleyways that showcase other Naples delicacies, like the babá and the sfogliatella. I want to try it all; but I keep my eye on the prize – just as I keep an empty stomach to prepare it for a feast. As I mentioned, like any self-respecting pizza lover should know: Naples is the birthplace of pizza. Naturally I had to pay this place a visit and try it. Titi and I reach the Lungomare, the seafront promenade in the bay of Naples. A beautiful sight of Mount Vesuvius and the mediterranean sea. Along the Lungomare there is an alluring amount of restaurants and bars to enjoy an aperitivo, or a pizza, while enjoying the light sea breeze. We almost sit down for our meal, but we opt to go a bit deeper, a bit more local.

We find a small ristorante in the heart of Naples. A place called “Sorbillo,” very much known to the native Neapolitan. This is the kind of place filled with locals and bustling with provincial vibes. A restaurant which mostly serves pizza. We are lucky. On that particular day, we don’t have to wait long to be seated. We are lead upstairs while we ogle the other costumers’ cheesy pies. We can’t wait, so the story goes… we both order the original pizza Margherita. Originally made for Queen Margherita de Savoy after her visit to the city in the 19th century. Let us take in the fact that the emblematic pizza Margherita was made for royalty; and before it acquired its fame, it used to be a dish for the poor. This only goes to show the revolution of history and of food. How a dish can transform cultures and societies; and no, this is not an overstatement.

The pizza Margherita (my favorite btw), is topped with San Marzano tomatoes. – which naturally grow in the volcanic plains south of Mount Vesuvius, – and with Mozzarella di Bufala di Campania, which is made by the milk of water buffalos strictly raised in Lazio or Campania. The flour used in its purest form is what Italians refer to as “00.” Neapolitan pizza has to adhere to guidelines of authenticity! So you can imagine the purity and delight. The pizza is a success. Of course, the supposed “anarchy” of the city does not put a damper on my trip, nor should it. It gives a city character, life, oh and you will likely get a good story out of it. 

In short, food is partly about the taste, but to truly enjoy the marvels of food, make a real experience out of it. Cheers!

I would love to hear your thought! Comment, contact me, or share!

Un bacio!